Are Vet Costs Contributing to the Increase of Owner Surrenders?

21 11 2010

Just like your family doctor, your veterinarian is an important part of your family. Even healthy dogs have to see the vet for vaccines, yearly checkups and overall routine treatments. But are you being overcharged for your vet’s services?

Our animals, just like us, have health issues; whether these  appear as a puppy or are the diseases that come along with aging like heart failure, diabetes and cancer, they aren’t any different from us in that respect. But just as we complain about the high cost of our own medical treatments, some believe that the cost for caring for our animals is too high, and as a result, contributing to the increase in owner surrenders.

One pet owner recently expressed her frustration with the veterinarians who only consider the financial aspect of veterinary medicine and the charges implemented by her small animal vet, “Although I totally agree with responsible pet ownership, small animal vets make it impossible for people to “do the right thing.” Thank God we can afford the high vet bills for our small animals but I think to myself, “How in the world can the average family afford to take care of their animals veterinary care?”

Most pet owners know when they agree to take on the responsibility of a pet that it will include medical costs, just as bringing a baby into the family does. But for those who haven’t done their homework before adopting a pet, read on as we outline some ways to help make veterinary costs a little more bearable.

PLEASE NOTE: These tips are suggestions only and not meant to take the place of vet care – particularly in an emergency. The information below is intended for healthy animals;, if your pet shows signs of illness, serious or otherwise, or if you are unsure of or uncomfortable with any of the suggestions we have outlined here, talk to your vet immediately.

Vaccines

Veterinarians have told us for years that our dogs need a yearly booster vaccine. A little known fact, and one that some veterinarians aren’t likely to share you with you without a little prompting is that we have been, in fact, over-vaccinating our pets. Once your dog reaches the “adult” stage of life, the yearly vaccine boosters are actually bad for the dog’s immune system and their overall health.

Now before you set your keyboard on fire typing out a comment to this…stop. I’m not saying vaccines aren’t necessary – they are. I’m simply trying to outline ways for you to save a little money and still be a responsible pet owner.

Healthy puppies need the boosters because their immune systems aren’t healthy enough to fend off illness. As such, you should avoid taking your puppy to public places, like dog parks and even the groomer, until they have had three boosters; otherwise you are opening up yourself and your puppy up to contracting the deadly Parvo virus.

Saving money on these important boosters is easy. Buy the boosters online or check with your local feed store. IMPORTANT: If you find them at your local feed store, remember that the boosters need to be constantly refrigerated so bring a small sandwich cooler with some ice for your trip home. Also remember – the vaccines are NOT to be shaken before injected! This causes the medication to break down, thus rendering the vaccine useless.

Veterinarians charge you for the office visit AND mark up the cost of these boosters in order for them to  make money on their services. By the time your puppy is twelve weeks old, he/she will need three boosters and de-worming shots. By buying and administering the shots yourself, you can enjoy a savings of up to $200.

Diagnostic Tests

 Another area veterinarians tend to either overcharge or perform services that may not necessarily be in your pet’s best interest is diagnostic testing.

While certain diagnostic tests are necessary in assisting with diagnosis, as a pet owner, you are entitled to know what tests are being administered and whether or not they are necessary. Don’t be afraid to ask questions! Ask if the test is necessary. Ask what the test will determine.  Ask if there is another option to the testing.

Become an Empowered Pet Owner

When you bring a four-legged member into your family, it is your duty to be a responsible pet owner. When it comes to their health, it your responsibility to become an EMPOWERED pet owner. It is your right to ask questions and if necessary, ask for a second opinion. When, and only when, you have all of the facts at your fingertips can you make the right choice for, and act in, the best interest of your pet.

If you are interested in receiving a FREE report on how to avoid being taken advantage of at your veterinarian’s office, please contact us.

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4 responses

21 11 2010
Cheryl

I agree with you about the UN-need for vaccines but I do think the majority of veterinarians do not know the facts. Do the drug reperstenatives go to the vet schools and talk about the need for vaccines? I think they do. They tell the students they need to vaccinate and it becomes fact for the students.
Finding research to back this information about over vaccinating and getting it to the vets is a much needed service. Horses are just as overvaccinated which is making them unhealthy.

21 11 2010
animalrescuesuperhighway

We are working on a special report to back up the information for not needing vaccinations – or at the very least the yearly boosters. I do believe that they are important for puppies but I also believe that once they have been protected as puppies the boosters are “over kill.” Please subscribe and stay tuned for the special report.

21 11 2010
Kathryn

Western Vets, however well-meaning, are educated in colleges that rely upon
vaccine and pharmaceutical companies for funding in the form of sponsorship,
research grants, scholarships and bursaries. Colleges are reliant upon big
business for funding, and few people are willing to bite the hand that feeds
them. Vets’ education with regard to vaccines tends to stop beyond “do it”.
Sadly, a vet will be the last one to educate you on the disadvantages of
annual vaccines. Vaccines are the NUMBER ONE money-maker for vets

Vaccinating does not protect – it puts stress on the body’s immune system
every time one is given, therefore making the body more vulnerable to
parasites and viral and bacterial infections… Protection does not come in
the form of “scientifically” formulated kibble dog foods, vaccines,
heartworm pesticides, topical flea treatments and wormers. These forms of
“protection” are unnatural and have many adverse side-effects often
resulting in chronic disease and sometimes death.

A titer test can be performed by your vet, which will show you your pet is OVER
vaccinated.

One of the reasons for the appearance of aggression issues is thought to be
the mercury, aluminum and/or formaldehyde in the vaccine.

Possible Side-effects From Rabies Vaccine –
Restless nature, suspicion of others, aggression to animals and people
Changes in behavior: aloofness, unaffectionate, desire to roam, OR clingy,
separation anxiety, velcro dog. Restraining can lead to violent behavior and
self-injury Self-mutilation, tail chewing Voice changes, excessive barking
Chronic poor appetite, very finicky Paralysis of throat or tongue, sloppy
eaters, drooling Dry eye, loss of sight, cataract Eating wood, stones,
earth, stool Destructive behavior, shredding bedding Seizures, epilepsy,
twitching Increase…d sexual desire, sexual aggression, Irregular pulse,
heart failure, Reverse sneezing, Kidney damage

Vaccination for your pets are dangerous, become informed, do your homework,
don’t just take my word for it , there is plenty of info to absorb out
there, soak it all up !

The next time you get that reminder in the mail to get your pet’s yearly booster shots, you may want to pause and reconsider

Wake up folks !

21 11 2010
animalrescuesuperhighway

Very well said, Kathryn, and I can’t agree with you more. Just as I believe our human doctors are “in bed” with the pharmaceutical companies, vets are no different. We are working on a special report to enlighten pet owners about the dangers of over-vaccinating their animals. If you haven’t already, I invite you to subscribe to our blog and stay tuned for the availability of the report.

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